Tag Archives: Randomized Controlled Trials

Comment on my post about the Beneductus trial

The authors of the Beneductus trial commented on my post about the trial, but it has somehow disappeared from the comment section of the blog, as they raise very valid points, I thought I would copy what they sent here … Continue reading

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How much protein should we provide to the preterm in the first days of life?

Extremely preterm infants become catabolic rapidly after birth, with the sudden interruption of their trans-placental nutrient supply to the fetus, who becomes a baby that has tiny stores of fat or glycogen. We progressed in neonatology from starving preterm babies … Continue reading

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It’s Raining Antibiotics

Early onset sepsis is a serious condition with a substantial morbidity, and, thankfully, a relatively low mortality in recent years. Prompt recognition and early treatment are essential, but early clinical signs and risk factors tend to be non-specific. As a … Continue reading

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Do omega 3 fatty acids make preterm babies smarter?

It seems that they do, perhaps a little bit! There are now a confusing array of trials of supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants. They have compared various control diets to differing PUFA supplements. Many of them have … Continue reading

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Time to stop placebo injections in neonatal research projects

Randomized controlled trials are the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. If a treatment has a good theoretical rationale, and preclinical data showing efficacy, the only way to prove efficacy in the human is to randomise patients to the treatment, compared to … Continue reading

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Reducing pain from retinopathy screening

Retinopathy screening is undoubtedly painful for preterm babies, formal evaluation with PIPP scores routinely exceed 10 during screening, and may exceed 14, meaning moderate to severe pain. As a planned procedure there is always opportunity for pre-emptive analgesia prior to … Continue reading

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What dose of caffeine to use?

The dose of caffeine that we used for the CAP trial was the dose that was being widely used at the time. It seemed to be a safe dose, that did not require serum concentration surveillance, but was not based … Continue reading

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Toxicity of antenatal steroids on the developing brain.

A new study from Finland this time, raises similar concerns to those from a Canadian study. (Raikkonen K, et al. Associations Between Maternal Antenatal Corticosteroid Treatment and Psychological Developmental and Neurosensory Disorders in Children. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5(8):e2228518). It is … Continue reading

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Cord milking and resuscitation, an alternative?

My recent posts about resuscitation with an intact cord were rapidly followed by a publication of another multicentre randomized controlled trial, this time a cluster randomized crossover trial, of cord milking in babies who needed intervention. (Katheria AC, et al. … Continue reading

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Is glucose gel safe? Is it necessary?

The Auckland group has been studying the treatment and implications of neonatal hypoglycaemia for many years now, with unique high quality studies. Two of their recent publications have addressed the safety of glucose gel for hypoglycaemia, the first (St Clair … Continue reading

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