Author Archives: keithbarrington

About keithbarrington

I am a neonatologist and clinical researcher at Sainte Justine University Health Center in Montréal

Eye exams for fewer babies

In Canada, the current Canadian Pediatric Society recommendations, dating from 2016 are to screen infants for retinopathy of prematurity with Gestational Age <31 weeks or Birth weight <1,251 g. These recommendations are already somewhat more restrictive than other countries, in … Continue reading

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Not futile any more; survival and long term outcomes at 22 weeks.

Imagine, if you will, that you work at a breast cancer center with moderately good results, but you have decided, as a group, to not offer therapy to women with stage 4- triple negative lesions. Survival is so low, you … Continue reading

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How fast to feed?

One of the recurring themes in this blog is that good, large enough, prospective RCTs do not necessarily reproduce the results of prior smaller trials, and often do not reproduce the findings of observational studies. Specifically, I have mentioned previously … Continue reading

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Should we try?

Arnolds M, et al. Worth a Try? Describing the Experiences of Families during the Course of Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit When the Prognosis is Poor. The Journal of pediatrics. 2018;196:116-22 e3. A few times a year many … Continue reading

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Why is MOM best? part 2

MOM is best, because it leads to the lowest incidence of NEC; but why? (if you didn’t read part 1, MOM is Mother’s Own Milk) The impacts of milk processing which create the differences in milk composition, detailed in my … Continue reading

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Why is MOM best?

Mother’s Own Milk (MOM) seems to be the best base for enteral nutrition of the preterm infant, in terms of the risk of infection, the risk of Enterocolitis (NEC) and, probably, long term neurodevelopment. Reasonably good data show that replacing … Continue reading

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Dr William Meadow 1948-2019

A sad way to fire up the blog after a long summer break. My good friend and colleague, Bill Meadow, died a few days ago. I first got to know Bill when I was junior faculty in Edmonton. At that … Continue reading

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