Author Archives: keithbarrington

About keithbarrington

I am a neonatologist and clinical researcher at Sainte Justine University Health Center in Montréal

Sail Away, Sail Away…

You could probably guess that a post about the SAIL trial (Kirpalani H, et al. Effect of Sustained Inflations vs Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death Among Extremely Preterm Infants: The SAIL Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2019;321(12):1165-75.) … Continue reading

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To p or not to p, what is the alternative?

I started writing the previous post several weeks ago, and, of course, the ideas are not original with me, in fact, a whole recent issue of “The American Statistician” is dedicated to not just trying to eliminate talk of statistical … Continue reading

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To p or not to p, that is the question.

I can’t claim preference for this title, although I wish I could. I copied it from an article published in an ENT journal (Buchinsky FJ, Chadha NK. To P or Not to P: Backing Bayesian Statistics. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. … Continue reading

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Partnering with parents

For a few years now Annie Janvier in our unit has been developing programs of partnership with families. Using contacts with mostly “veteran parents”, and occasionally veteran patients, we have developed partnerships in research, patient care, and education. The “PAF” … Continue reading

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How should we evaluate heart rate during neonatal resuscitation?

Many babies receive some sort of “resuscitation” during their transition from intra-uterine to extra-uterine life. How do we decide when a baby needs intervention? A baby who is active and breathing is usually left alone, a baby who is neither … Continue reading

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Death or oxygen, which is worse?

We have a big problem in neonatal research. We have constructed composite outcomes that have become the “standard of design”, but are not of much use for anyone. Because we are, rightly, concerned that death and other diagnoses may be … Continue reading

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Clinical evaluation vs Technology

Two recent trials in adult ICU patients ask very interesting questions, questions which are only linked by testing something clinically simple versus a more technologically demanding evaluation. The first was comparing the use of serum lactate concentrations versus capillary filling … Continue reading

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