Tag Archives: Ethics

Long term survival in trisomy 13 and 18

After my previous post on this topic, John Lantos wrote a comment pointing out this recent publication, Nelson KE, et al. Survival and Surgical Interventions for Children With Trisomy 13 and 18. JAMA. 2016;316(4):420-8. It is a large regional cohort, identified from … Continue reading

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Two New Publications

After a few weeks break (for a number of reasons), I’m ready to start blogging again! I’m sure you have all missed the succinct and perceptive critiques of the recent neonatal literature, but today I will start with 2 publications … Continue reading

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Moral Distress among nurses (and others).

This publication appeared on-line a couple of months ago, and still isn’t in print. Prentice T, et al. Moral distress within neonatal and paediatric intensive care units: a systematic review. Arch Dis Child. 2016. It is a systematic review from Melbourne, … Continue reading

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Making Good Decisions: part 3. Living with the aftermath

When there are decisions made about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining interventions for a baby. There are 2 possible long term outcomes, either the baby will be there a few weeks hence, or not. What do we know about how parents … Continue reading

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Making Good Decisions; part 2

Green J, et al. Quality versus quantity: The complexities of quality of life determinations for neonatal nurses. Nurs Ethics. 2016. This study used a mixture of quantitative (survey of over 400 nurses) and qualitative (interviews with 24 nurses) methods. The … Continue reading

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Making Good Decisions; part 1

White DB, et al. Prevalence of and Factors Related to Discordance About Prognosis Between Physicians and Surrogate Decision Makers of Critically Ill Patients. JAMA. 2016;315(19):2086. This is a really cool study among families who had a family member in the … Continue reading

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The multidisciplinary conference, a parental view.

When patients are more complex than average, or there are multiple complications, or difficult ethical issues, we frequently organize “multidisciplinary conferences” which involve all the medical consultants and nursing, often also our social work and/or psychology personnel and the spiritual … Continue reading

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