Tag Archives: Analgesia

Evidence-based neonatology, or science based neonatology?

To many followers of this blog, the title may seem a little strange; is there any difference? Surely science underlies all of our field, and testing treatments in adequately designed trials leads to progressive improvements through the application of evidence-based … Continue reading

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Skin to skin contact reduces pain… in mothers!

Some neonatal interventions for pain relief don’t seem to work in older subjects, sucrose for example doesn’t seem effective out of the neonatal period, a study from our Emergency Room showed no benefit of sucrose for bladder catheterisation in infants … Continue reading

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Ethically acceptable pain research

Just imagine for a moment that you are the parent of Jo, who is 4 years old, Jo has a sudden onset of breathlessness and the investigations in the Emergency Room show a spontaneous pneumothorax, that needs a drain. You … Continue reading

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Unethical pain research in the newborn. A list of shame.

Unethical pain studies are still being published, in journals which include several from mainstream publishing houses. In these studies published recently and appearing on-line in recent weeks, newborn infants were assigned by the researchers to experience pain. The reviewers of … Continue reading

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Babies feel pain, and they remember it!

I usually don’t post about studies of painful procedures where there was no analgesic prophylaxis in some of the the subjects, except to criticize them, and if they are recent, to call for their retraction. So when I first saw … Continue reading

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Pain studies with untreated control groups in babies are unethical.

If you are performing a study of pain control in the newborn and you assign babies to untreated controls, you are creating unnecessary avoidable pain in the control patients. That is true for any patient who is incompetent, obviously including … Continue reading

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The FDA warns against anaesthesia in the very young

There has been accumulating evidence of the potential risks of anaesthetic agents, such as risks of enhanced apoptosis in animal models and long-term functional effects in  those various animal models also. All anaesthetic agents appear to be affected, which I … Continue reading

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Many unethical pain studies in newborns

Carlo Bellieni and Celeste Johnston (Conflict of Interest flag, I have collaborated with both of them) have just reviewed a couple of recent years research of analgesic interventions in the newborn. Of 46 randomized studies of painful procedures, 70% had … Continue reading

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Pain is bad for you, sucrose makes it better (even if you are a rat).

I rarely discuss animal research in this blog, but occasionally something striking stimulates a new post. I have discussed sucrose not that long ago, in particular I emphasized the over-interpretation of a secondary analysis of a non-randomized comparison of very … Continue reading

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Long term effects of surgery in the infant

To follow on from a study in a recent “neonatal updates”, there is a new publication from an Australian group that have been pursuing a prospective cohort of full term infants who had major surgery in the first 90 days … Continue reading

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