Monthly Archives: April 2018

Its now or… later? A good question to ask ELVIS.

This study probably wins the prize for the best trial name in neonatal history, the Early or Late Ventricular Intervention Study, ELVIS. de Vries LS, et al. Treatment thresholds for intervention in posthaemorrhagic ventricular dilation: a randomised controlled trial. Archives … Continue reading

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Teaming up with parents and ex-premies to improve care for babies

On April the XXth I will be running 10 kilometers in the Scotia Bank run, as part of the PAF-Néonat team of Sainte Justine Hospital (PAF means Partenarait Famille). We are raising funds for the partnering with families program, which … Continue reading

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Neonatal updates

This post is  a bit of a catch up, to mention articles that are worth reading, but which I didn’t have time to write a full post about, in particular studies that could have a positive impact on clinical care. … Continue reading

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Shake it up baby

When babies have respiratory pauses, the usual initial intervention is tactile stimulation of some kind. Which leads to a few questions: does it work? how does it work (if it does)? what mode of stimulation is most effective? If you … Continue reading

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Parents as Partners

One of the initiatives in our NICU is the implication of former parents of NICU patients; we have been examining ways of integrating former parents as support/resource/information sources for parents who arrive in neonatology with little idea of what to … Continue reading

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Quoted in “nature”

An interesting and well-written article in nature (or, at least, a supplement called “nature outlook”) by a scientific journalist Sarah DeWeerdt has appeared, discussing the acquisition of the intestinal microbiome by newborn infants. She discusses premature infants and the role … Continue reading

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Reducing medical errors

There has been a lot of activity recently around a case that happened several years ago. In a hospital in the UK a boy with trisomy 21 was admitted, with signs of infection, and he deteriorated and died. Several signs … Continue reading

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