Monthly Archives: February 2018

Breast Milk is good for you; does it matter how you get it?

The benefits of human, especially mother’s own, breast milk are unambiguous, but is expressed breast milk as good as direct breast-feeding? A new cohort study from Canada (Klopp A, et al. Modes of Infant Feeding and the Risk of Childhood … Continue reading

Posted in Neonatal Research | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Probiotics might save lives in low-resource countries

After several years of preliminary investigations,  a huge RCT has been published from India (Panigrahi P, et al. A randomized synbiotic trial to prevent sepsis among infants in rural India. Nature. 2017;548:407.) which enrolled babies over 2 kg birth weight … Continue reading

Posted in Neonatal Research | Leave a comment

Endotracheal intubation, making it safer for babies

Many of our patients need invasive ventilatory support, for which endotracheal intubation is required, but we intubate many fewer babies than in the past. We also very rarely intubate babies for endotracheal suction to remove meconium any longer. Which means … Continue reading

Posted in Neonatal Research | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Does tactile stimulation in the delivery room actually do anything?

One of the things that is done in neonatal resuscitation that isn’t part of resuscitating older patients is tactile stimulation. Babies who are apneic and/or floppy often receive stimulation in the form of rubbing the back, patting or flicking the … Continue reading

Posted in Neonatal Research | Tagged | 2 Comments

New Published Letter, a response to the ‘number needed to suffer’.

The new issue of Acta Paediatrica (Februray 2018) includes a letter I wrote in response to a commentary written by a paediatric anaesthetist, Dr Lönnqvist. If you receive an email with a description of the contents of each issue, as … Continue reading

Posted in Neonatal Research | Tagged , , | Leave a comment