Tag Archives: nutrition

Why is MOM best? part 2

MOM is best, because it leads to the lowest incidence of NEC; but why? (if you didn’t read part 1, MOM is Mother’s Own Milk) The impacts of milk processing which create the differences in milk composition, detailed in my … Continue reading

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Why is MOM best?

Mother’s Own Milk (MOM) seems to be the best base for enteral nutrition of the preterm infant, in terms of the risk of infection, the risk of Enterocolitis (NEC) and, probably, long term neurodevelopment. Reasonably good data show that replacing … Continue reading

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Measure gastric residuals? Safe to stop?

A new RCT published in JAMA pediatrics compared growth and other clinical outcomes between infants <33 weeks gestation and <1250g who were managed with routine gastric residual measurements or without. (Parker LA, et al. Effect of Gastric Residual Evaluation on … Continue reading

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Growing bigger, or growing better?

Babies with postnatal growth failure in the NICU do worse in the long term. This is a statistical association known for a long time. We also know that increasing nutritional intake, in calories and protein can prevent the relative weight … Continue reading

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Better Nutrition, Better Brains

I write frequently on this blog about how prejudice regarding developmental and neurologic problems, and prejudice about preterm infants, combine to over-emphasize the difficulties that former preterm babies have, to the extent that professional societies develop guidelines for withholding care … Continue reading

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Feed and grow

How to measure growth? How to describe growth rates? What does it matter? Several related articles in today’s post, the first two are about how to measure growth in preterm infants: Ashton JJ, et al. Assessing the growth of preterm … Continue reading

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Hey, doctor, leave those guts alone!

Intestinal function is often sluggish after preterm delivery. Establishing early enteral nutrition, the goal of all of us, is interrupted often by repeated regurgitation, or large residuals (if you measure them) or abdominal distension. There are also reported correlations between … Continue reading

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