Tag Archives: Research Design

Research Outcomes in Neonatology : must do better.

When planning a research project with neonatal patients the first question should be, what am I investigating? The PICO outline : standing for Patients, Intervention, Controls (or comparison) and Outcome, is a standardized way of asking the simple question. If … Continue reading

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To p or not to p, what is the alternative?

I started writing the previous post several weeks ago, and, of course, the ideas are not original with me, in fact, a whole recent issue of “The American Statistician” is dedicated to not just trying to eliminate talk of statistical … Continue reading

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To p or not to p, that is the question.

I can’t claim preference for this title, although I wish I could. I copied it from an article published in an ENT journal (Buchinsky FJ, Chadha NK. To P or Not to P: Backing Bayesian Statistics. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. … Continue reading

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Death or oxygen, which is worse?

We have a big problem in neonatal research. We have constructed composite outcomes that have become the “standard of design”, but are not of much use for anyone. Because we are, rightly, concerned that death and other diagnoses may be … Continue reading

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Reading Research: Subgroups and Observational studies

In publications of randomized controlled trials, subgroup analyses are frequently performed. The idea behind such analyses being to determine whether one group or another has a different result to the overall results, for example, whether boys or girls have more … Continue reading

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Two New Publications

After a few weeks break (for a number of reasons), I’m ready to start blogging again! I’m sure you have all missed the succinct and perceptive critiques of the recent neonatal literature, but today I will start with 2 publications … Continue reading

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The best outcome variable for very preterm newborns?

Death or ‘neurodevelopmental impairment’ (NDI) as a combined outcome has become a sort of de facto standard as the primary outcome for neonatal clinical trials. Because many very preterm infants have developmental delay, intellectual and learning difficulties, and some have … Continue reading

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