Monthly Archives: September 2015

Cochrane review featured on their website

Our recently published Cochrane review of resuscitation training programs is now a featured review on their website.

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Photos of preterms

A Québec photographer by the name of Red Méthot has posted a series of photographs of children and adults who were formerly preterm babies. Each holding a black and white photograph of themselves as a baby. Check it out.

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Treating seizures: bumetanide doesn’t seem to work

One of the many frustrating things in neonatology is the treatment of convulsions. As Gerry Boylan and Ronit Pressler wrote in the introductory section of the excellent issue of Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine which was all about neonatal seizures, … Continue reading

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NRP Works!

When the neonatal resuscitation program was first introduced I think many of us had mixed feelings. I was concerned that some of the initial recommendations were opinion-based rather than evidence-based  (and they weren’t all consistent with my opinions, which are … Continue reading

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Many unethical pain studies in newborns

Carlo Bellieni and Celeste Johnston (Conflict of Interest flag, I have collaborated with both of them) have just reviewed a couple of recent years research of analgesic interventions in the newborn. Of 46 randomized studies of painful procedures, 70% had … Continue reading

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An astounding betrayal

Some of us may have heard of the problems with the data concerning SSRIs (a commonly used class of antidepressants) and, in particular, young people. It appears that drug companies hid and distorted data from controlled trials, in order to … Continue reading

Posted in Not neonatology | 3 Comments

Burping babies

It is very satisfying sometimes, to sit a baby on your knee, lean them forward slightly and rub or pat their back until a loud pleasing burp is heard. Parenting websites, and MDs, nurses, and midwives often promote burping as … Continue reading

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